Writing Styles for Writers

And it’s 2 months down already. Can you believe it? Anyway!

It’s been a while I wrote about ‘what are writing styles‘ and I won’t shy away from confessing that I’d totally forgotten about the follow-up post I’d promised to do.

Nevertheless, here I am.

Previously we discussed how it is important to have a writing style of your own. It takes time to arrive at it, but only perseverance can get you there. And although, you may have found your style, I think it is imperative that one ought to keep exploring newer ways just so we can constantly improve ourselves.

Before I get off the track again, let me tell you this.

If it took a hundred tough steps to beat apprehensions around starting to write, it’ll take a thousand to have found the writing style. But you can do it, if you go on.

So, to aid you a bit in your journey of discovering your style, I pick out things I’ve discovered in the past 4 years of my writing tribulations. Here’re some styles I think can work good enough if you hone the sword of your writing skills on the whetstone of your writing style.

Tell-it-All style

Do you like to go right into the details of things? If yes, then you probably are doing that with your writing too, consciously or unconsciously. Some of us can’t seem to be satisfied unless we’ve had a good 20-30 lines of content before a topic or tale is finished. The end result usually is all-too-long paragraphs before you say ‘THE END’. Have you read Dickens or Tolkein? They’re a classic example. The benefit of this style is that a reader gets a comprehensive view of the writer’s thoughts.

Cut-to-chase style

Listing only the essentials is what I’d call ‘Cut-to-the-chase’ style is all about. Skipping the unnecessary chunks to hit the crux of the matter is a brilliant way of writing. This style entails a maximum 5-6 line paragraph with enough meat in the limited content. This works best for those who like to have the crucial servings of a piece of work at a mere glance. Rowling or Lahiri beautifully depict this style. The downside though is – it’s a task to package words in a manner that is both frugal and efficient.

Ask-your-Reader style

What’s the best way to grab attention? Asking questions. This I learnt in school. Teachers would pose a hundred questions to students just so they were engaged in the classroom activities. The same trick works with our audience, irrespective of their age. When you ask questions in your writing, the reader feels involved and nothing works better, to have them glued to your writing. Coelho and Maurier remind me just how easily you can have your readers asking for more!

Now, I’ve tried to put together bits that my mind’s carefully observed over the years. They’ve worked all right for me and then not. They’ve made me bleed and then some more. Keeping it simple has helped me come a long way but still it took years to finally sculpt what I really wanted my style to be like. I can’t really vouch these will work for you. You really have to try and test for yourself.

What’s your style? Have I missed anything here that you’ve discovered in your writing experience? Please share. I’d love to read all about it.

Asha Seth

125 thoughts on “Writing Styles for Writers

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  1. This is great I’ve been looking for more resources on the nitty gritty of prose etc, rather than the usual writing discussions about character, plot and structure (which is all very fun to talk about but kinda falls over if your prose stinks right?) Thanks!

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    1. It does matter a lot what outfit your writing’s dressed in. I hope to make this place a better world to live in, at least for writers, albeit the newbies. Thanks, Thomas.

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  2. Interesting post. My writing style is cut to chase style and I want to try the writing style tell it all, just for a variety but I would stick to the cut to chase style😊😊 your posts are really helpful.

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  3. Creating a writing voice is what makes us all so different. I love a few other writers and when I was younger, wished I could write like them, but they are the only ones that can. We have to write to be ourselves. My style is quite interesting, but I like to consider myself a “cut to the chase” kind of guy. I don’t include a lot of description in my work which cuts word count, but increases story…for me at least 😌

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    1. I like how you pack the message in just about 80-100 words. It needs skill to be able to do that so efficiently. Have always tried that myself, but never been good enough I guess. Your observation will sure help many a writers. Thank you, Anthony.

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  4. Mr Fitzgerald is admirable, of course. And I’m happy for anything that reminds you of me. 😉
    You’re style truly follows the ‘Tell-it-all’ and you do it brilliantly; one can never get bored.
    Why don’t you share the post of your link here. I’d love to visit it.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Co-incidentally, I also had dedicated a post to writing style, which is something entirely different from what you have mentioned, yesterday. I had written what I had learnt in past few months. While mentioning, F. Scott Fitzgerald, it was your name that struck my mind. 🙂
    From the styles that you have mentioned, I am, undoubtedly, a Tell-it-all and Ask-the-reader kind. 😀 Working on Cut-to-chase style. That definitely is not my genre, but again a style worth learning. 🙂

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  6. There seems to be a backlash against Tolkien style description in books recently which is a shame as I think description is great as long as the story keeps the reader interested or maybe people simply don’t have the patience these days. I think a mix of styles is great to have in the collection, it’s like a rollercoaster of choice and all styles should be celebrated.

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    1. I guess you’re absolutely right in saying that readers truly don’t have enough patience. There’s a certain taste you need for classics and not all prefer that especially when most literature today is usually just cut to essentials kind.
      Short stories for that matter, goes well with most readers. Even I am one. But then again, it totally depends on my mood.
      I too prefer a mix and match of styles, if nothing then for variety.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Agreed, mixing and matching allows for a greater depth of titles and styles and keeps your our reading life interesting, that is the way forward…I could never understand those people who just read one genre.

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  7. Although I’m still working on my style,based on what you have rightly pointed out, I’d say I fit squarely in the tell-it-all style. Too many details and too much info. I’d like to be the cut to the chase types, but I don’t think I can ever manage it
    Great post, always ☺️

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    1. Super. Now that you know you’re style, you only have to chisel it. To get to the cut-to-chase style, there’s just one simple rule to follow – skip the unnecessary. That done consciously and consistently will take you there. 🙂
      Happy to hear from you, Pradipta. How have you been?

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  8. WoW!!! awesome post……..i don’t know about the styles…….but i sure try to not be too tied to a certain format………i am more of “as the mood strikes” kind………but i sure want it to be interactive…….readers must not feel totally left out……. 🙂 🙂

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  9. Have not written much so don’t know a style i have one
    but I want my writing to be humurous and full of fun
    Some i think are very good but some are surely overdone
    And then there are some which have ended before they have begun.

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  10. What a good post for me to read Asha! I do not know that I have ever really thought about my writing having a style…so thank you for giving me this now to put some good thought into! ❤ ❤ ❤

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    1. You’re too new a kid to this world dear, and although you’re doing impressively well, I guess, only consistency will help you find it. Also, keep on the lookout for patterns in your posts. You may come across it surprised, if it’s been evading your eyes. In any case, good luck gurl. 🙂

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      1. My writings mostly come under category the first and the last you mentioned…anyways have a nice time dear Asha Di. ..hope you got free from office and going home.

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  11. I think writing style has to do more with what you are writing about. For example if you are writing a detective novel there are different writing styles that come to play. One is a straight narrative where the writer tells the story and you only know the thoughts of the characters when they are speaking . Then there is speaking in the first person when the main character shares his thoughts with the readers . My point is it is important to also know what you are writing so as to determine the best writing style.

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    1. There, you are, sharing your wise words, Jerry. 🙂 I agree, the medium is pretty important to decide your style and it may sure vary from piece to piece, depending on the genre. I guess, as writers, we are not always sure what we are writing, that is as far as we aren’t noveling. The styles I listed are just basics one would want to explore, and then lead there on. If it at all helps, complemented with your insights, that’d be brilliant.

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          1. We have been having good weather lately which is weird for February when it is usually bone chilling cold and lots of snow but we like I said have been having good weather.

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  12. I’m the over-writer type. I put more of my thought process on the page during my first draft than is strictly necessary, because I’m basically telling the story to myself. I trim that all down and streamline it during the editing process.

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    1. Happy to see you add your precious thoughts here, Maite. I follow suit when it I’m filling my diary because then I’m just pouring myself out; not for others to know. With blog posts, it goes through rigorous editing, until it’s safe for publishing. 😛

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  13. Lovely post Asha and to be frank am not sure what is my style. 😳. I do a little writing so can’t predict. You have got a good hands on experience and learning through the years. That’s a great thing. Awesome work.
    Meena

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    1. What you do is great. My sister has tried few of your recipes and she’s rally loved them. I guess you do have a style already and that makes your recipes, yummier. 😉 As for writing, I guess, the learning never ends. Always happy to see you around. 🙂

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      1. Aww you made my day dear. Happy to hear that. You know sometimes I think should I be doing this, as I get demotivated. But then when I here someone say the recipes are good. Then I get motivated. So thanks for that, appreciate it a lot. Love you loads and happy weekend Asha.

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  14. When I began writing it was more of a tell it all approach – in fact I had trouble switching scenes because I liked to ramble on and on over what happened next and then and so on. But then I tried flash fiction that has helped me tighten up – although I am still not quite sure of my style, if i have a style. Perhaps a reader would be able to better identify it. What do you think? Thanks for a thought provoking article.

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    1. Yes, I totally agree, Dahlia (wonder if that’s your name. :P) As a reader you get to notice if there’s a style at all n the writing. As a writer, it’s less obvious.
      Be around as your thoughts are mighty good. 🙂

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  15. Yes, this post! 🙂 I like how you have segregated the writing styles. I have yet to find mine. I think I tend to toggle back and forth between keeping it simple and spelling it all out. Though, I do tend to side with less content which says more. I don’t know. Only when I keep writing, will I come to know. 🙂

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    1. We, all, tend to do that. It’s always a struggle between keeping it short and pouring our heart out when we write. But I believe we must as well, just pour it all out and worry less about the length bit, that is, if it makes you feel satisfied once you’re done.
      It’s always a good practice to revisit it a day or so later and then maybe, get rid of the extra words or sentiments that have forced themselves in. Keep writing, my friend, and soon the style will knock at your door. 😎

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Thanks for sharing this. Its nice to know the different styles out there. We’ve got a rough draft for a new short story called eaten an Eskimo and we could take all the advice we can get. Please stop by my blog Gastradamus and let us know what you think

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    1. I’ve shared what I merely know. I’m sure there’s a lot more to know and learn. I love short stories. I’ll be over yours soon. Oh and btw, welcome here! 😛

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          1. Really hope you give it a read, what’s 20minutes? I understand though, its a little long, thank you so much for the responce and I hope to see your feedback one day

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    1. Yes, Jo. The minute you find it, you know it. Like a bell rings in the distant somewhere and it just strikes your conscience. It’s like the dawn of realisation that something right is happening when you write.

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  17. I think with studying English and reading so many different types and genres of books constantly, my own writing style gets confused and a little muddled at times. However, it also gives me lots of tips for my own writing! Great post! x

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    1. Reading varied genres sure opens new windows and the learning never ends. That, perhaps, is one of the best ways to explore different styles and try them for yourself.
      Glad you stopped by, Lucy. Welcome to my blog. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

“I love writing. I love the swirl and swing of words as they tangle with human emotions.” ― James A. Michener

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