#Quoted: Do not use semicolons…

As a writer, I am of the practice of using all the elements of punctuation. And I do tend to use the semicolon fairly often. I have always believed it comes quite handy if you know its proper usage. So, when I came across this quote, I realised I don’t quite agree with the author. Now, he may be good, he may be the best. But as a writer, I beg to differ.

Here’s the quote:kurt

Do you also believe that a semicolon is truly no good? What are your thoughts? Do tell.

~~~~~

Asha Seth

33 thoughts on “#Quoted: Do not use semicolons…

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  1. I only use a semi colon when I want to give equal weight to both parts of a sentence, I think it’s underrated as a punctuation mark, possibly because semi implies a half hearted bit of punctuation!

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  2. I believe it’s just a matter of taste. Some writers love to use the semicolon, others… Well, they despise it. I think everyone should do what feels best for them. After all, anything and everything in the world of writing is subjective. And that is the beauty of it.

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  3. The semi colon isn’t a problem if most punctuations in an article use semicolon. But, since the usage of semi colon is, in fact, lesser than a comma or a full stop, that odd semi colon is a little distracting and kinda breaks my reading flow. Just my opinion

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  4. Ha! I just used that quote as the lead-in to a post I wrote last week. But much as I love Kurt, I don’t think I agree with his point, either. Although I don’t think I’ve used a single semi-colon since. I think that just means I’m too susceptible to suggestion.

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    1. Hehe! I have heard and read a lot about the author in mention but haven’t read his books yet. Somehow, the fact that I do not agree with his opinion intrigues me to read some of his works and find out what else I differ upon.
      Hah! The way the brain works, I am never to find out. 😛

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  5. I think the main point is that if you don’t know their proper usage, don’t use them at all. Semicolons tend to disappear from my native language (Greek). Many blame the inadequencies of education while others blame computers (Greek semicolon is a combo not readily available or apparent). But I sincerely believe there is a more profound cause and this is simply the changes in speech. We may not perceive it but the way we speak has changed. The “long” sentences are mostly gone even in literature. I am no expert, just a layman when it comes to language but I think it’s just a manifestation of language’s evolution.a

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    1. You have a deeper insight into the usage of them half-brothers of colons. And since we write shorter sentences, we hardly find a need for them. But most prominently, this is all because language has evolved much. I have noticed I tend to use commas lesser and lesser. When I write, my brain consciously reminds me of constructing simpler sentences. And I do away with most of the puncs.

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  6. This is awesome Asha because I am a prolific user of the semicolon. I do not believe I am an educated writer, other than I have always loved to do it, and my favorite assignments were always writing/reflection/essays. I guess I feel like it is not a very popular form of punctuation, and I am trying to keep it alive. I have an odd attachment to it. Great post! ~Anne

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    1. I agree much, Anne. I love to use it and I like how it structures up my sentences. Yes, it isn’t very popular but as long as it has writers like us using it, it is here to stay.

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“I love writing. I love the swirl and swing of words as they tangle with human emotions.” ― James A. Michener

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